Geothermal Energy 101 Webinar

A photo of steam rising from a hole drilled at a geothermal test site in New Mexico. The earth surrounding the corehole is covered with white snow. In the background are pine trees, white clouds, and a blue sky.

Here you'll find a presentation about the characteristics, development, and utilization of geothermal resources from a Tribal Energy Program Webinar presented on Aug.27, 2010, by John Lund with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

View a video of the presentation below or download a copy of the presentation, Geothermal Energy 101: Characteristics, Development, and Utilization of Geothermal Resources.

About the Presenter

John W. Lund is the past director (1997-2010) of the Geo-Heat Center at the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) and has worked in the direct utilization of geothermal energy for more than 35 years. He has a B.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado and an M.E. from the University of California, Berkeley, all in civil engineering. He is an emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering at OIT, where he taught for 32 years. He assisted with the installation of a 280-kilowatt geothermal binary power plant and the drilling of a 5,300-foot-deep geothermal well for a 1-megawatt geothermal power plant on the OIT campus.

Dr. Lund has been a member of the Advisory Committee on Geothermal Energy for the United States Department of Energy and is a past president of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) (2001-2002). He received the Geothermal Pioneer Award for "Outstanding Achievement in the Development of Geothermal Resources" from GRC in 1997 and the Joseph W. Aidlin Award for "outstanding contributions to the GRC and to the development of geothermal resources" in 2008. He was the president (2004-2007) and is now the past president of the International Geothermal Association (2007-2010).

Dr. Lund's main interests in geothermal energy are direct utilization, geothermal heat pumps, and small-scale and low-temperature power generation. When not at NREL, he lives in a geothermally heated home and works at OIT, the first campus in the world to receive all of its heat and electrical energy needs from geothermal energy.