This is an excerpt from EERE Network News, a weekly electronic newsletter.

August 21, 2002

L.A. Cathedral's 66-kW Solar Power System Shows Religious Commitment to Renewable Energy

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, the newest landmark in Los Angeles, will feature a 66-kilowatt (kW) solar power system on the roof of its conference center when it opens in September. The Los Angeles Department of Power and Water (LADWP) announced on August 15th that its Solar Incentive Program helped reduce the cost of the system, which was manufactured by PowerLight Corporation using Shell Solar photovoltaic panels.

"It is my hope that this partnership between LADWP and the Los Angeles Interfaith Environmental Council (LAIEC) will encourage the creation of similar 'green sanctuaries' throughout the City of Angels," said Cardinal Roger Mahony of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. See the LADWP press release.

The new cathedral will open to the public for the first time on September 3rd. See the cathedral Web site.

The cathedral is not the first example of religion mixing with renewable energy in California: an organization called California Interfaith Power and Light (CIPL), formed early this year, aims to activate California's 50,000 congregations to respond to global warming by promoting energy conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energy. The organization plans to sign up 1,000 congregations by year-end. See the CIPL Web site.

CIPL is an interfaith version of an earlier effort within the Episcopal Church, called Episcopal Power and Light (EP&L). EP&L was one of only two U.S.-based winners of the prestigious Energy Globe Award 2002, which honors sustainable energy solutions. EP&L is part of the Regeneration Project, a public charity that also co-founded CIPL. See the Regeneration Project Web site.

Other states are also starting to create organizations similar to these California groups: Massachusetts now has its own interfaith effort, called Massachusetts Interfaith Power and Light (MIP&L). See the MIP&L Web site.

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